After practicing yoga for over thirty years down in the big smoke we felt called to move back into nature into an environment ideal to go deeper into the higher limbs of yoga practice. The Vedas suggest that when one comes to the middle of ones life (around 50) to change ones mode of life and spend more time on spiritual practice in nature. This mode of life is called vanaprashtha (forest dweller). This same mode of life is suggested in many yogic texts. We took that quite literally and live now on a mountaintop surrounded by ancient rainforest. Living in nature inspires our practice greatly, which we can then share when we come back into the cities to teach workshops or retreats.

This blog will give you updates of what we are currently working on and it will give us the opportunity to stay in contact with the many people and students we have worked with throughout the last few decades. Of course if you want to post any questions, your mountaintop yogis will do their best to answer them.

Hatha Yoga or The Physical Dimension of Meditation

Hatha Yoga is the physical dimension of yoga, its two main disciplines being posture and breath work. But Hatha Yoga is not – or at least historically was not – a style of yoga that reduced it to the physical aspect. In the beginning there was only the one yoga, sometimes referred to as Maha Yoga, the great yoga. Before the one greater yoga broke apart into small factions, Hatha Yoga was the physical school through which all yogis had to pass. No yogi, however, remained at the level of Hatha Yoga or even reduced yoga to this level. Hatha Yoga was thus the ‘primary school’ of the […]

All yoga one

As the four Vedas were originally one, so all yoga in the beginning constituted one single system, sometimes called Maha Yoga, the great yoga. The separation into Bhakti, Karma, Hatha, Raja Yoga etc. is artificial, as they are only aspects of the one yoga. The various aspects of Hatha Yoga constitute nothing but the physical aspects of meditation. They are the groundwork and supports on which the structure of meditation is erected. […]

How to find the time for asana, pranayama and meditation?

I frequently get asked how modern yogis could find the time for for all the various yogic techniques that I am suggesting. My book ‘Yoga Meditation’ contains an extensive analysis of this problem, delving into what’s in India called phase of life (ashrama), world age (yuga), profession group (varna) and purpose in life (svadharma).

“How much to practice?

It is true, you can practice too much. This would be the case if your practice led you to neglecting your duties towards society and family […]

What is Kundalini?

The Purusha Sukta of the Rig Veda states that in the beginning there was the Brahman only. The Brahman is the deep reality or the infinite consciousness or the physicists call it the unified field or the state before the Big Bang. In order to create the world and bring about its own quality of reflectiveness/awareness the Brahman then became polar. The two poles in India are often called Shiva (pure consciousness) and Shakti (creative force) […]

Why is yogic Kundalini Meditation so powerful?

Yogic meditation is a highly scientific method. It derives its power from the fact that it systematically and step-by-step suspends the entire processing capacity of the subconscious mind and diverts it towards meditation. The processing power of the subconscious mind is a multiple of that of the conscious mind. We don’t know exactly how much but it may be 100 or more times as powerful as the conscious mind. Simply watching breath or watching awareness only encompasses your conscious mind […]

A Mandelbrot metaphor of yogic technique

The Mandelbrot-set is a formula named after the late mathematician Benoit Mandelbrot. Its geometrical representation is called a fractal, a complex pattern that looks the same or nearly the same from however far or close you watch it. Through the advent of powerful computers we now can watch on the web so-called Mandelbrot-set zooms. If you have never seen one I recommend watching some of them to understand this metaphor (and its great fun to watch them, too). As you zoom deeper and deeper into the fractal […]

Agings influence on Practice

I received requests from a few students to write about how body and practice changes as one gets older as people seem to struggle to keep up practice. Important here is to realize that asana practice was designed to support practice of meditation and pranayama. As you get older you need to shift emphasis from asana practice to the higher limbs. Try to limit your asana practice to 90 minutes and spend the rest on higher yogic practices […]

Healing knee injuries

This post describes important points to consider when wanting to heal knee injuries such as meniscus and cruciate ligament injuries. These injuries are common amongst modern yogis often due faulty performance of postures, forcing the legs into positions and lack of attention to detail.

What is prana?

As is the case with many other terms, prana can

have several meanings depending on context. For example some

yogic scriptures instruct you to draw the prana in through the left

nostril and expel it through the right and vice versa. Here, prana

simply means breath.

More often we come across passages that advise us not to let the

prana enter the head, or consciously push it into the arms to gain

strength or direct it into areas of the body that harbour disease. Very

common is also the scriptural advice to move prana into the central

energy channel (sushumna)[…]