After practicing yoga for over thirty years down in the big smoke we felt called to move back into nature into an environment ideal to go deeper into the higher limbs of yoga practice. The Vedas suggest that when one comes to the middle of ones life (around 50) to change ones mode of life and spend more time on spiritual practice than on earning ones livelihood. This mode of life is called vanaprashtha (forest dweller). This same mode of life is suggested in many yogic texts. Although our modern society strongly discourages us to devote ourselves primarily to spiritual practice when one could accumulate wealth, we decided to take the leap.

This blog will give you updates of what we are currently working on and it will give us the opportunity to stay in contact with the many people and students we have worked with throughout the last few decades. Of course if you want to post any questions, your mountaintop yogis will do their best to answer them.

Low Back Pain & Spinal Stabilisation

I encounter many students who tell me they are nursing an old disc injury, which in some cases occurred ten or more years ago. Whether your back pain is recent, long-standing or reoccurring, spinal stabilisation is an important factor that needs to be addressed for complete healing to occur. If we look at the anatomy of the spine from cranium to sacrum we can count (and I just did) 150 articulations where movement can occur! As yogis we tend to focus on increasing range of motion in our joints, however, especially in the spine stability is of utmost importance! […]

Learning from Indigenous Nations and victory for the Sioux at Standing Rock (at least for now)

Our current disconnect with nature enables its exploitation and destruction. This disconnect truly began with the sky-religions’ placing of our spiritual aspiration first outside of the biosphere into heaven and then into nothingness/emptiness. From there the trajectory went to science, technology and industrialism and more recently into cyberspace and virtual reality …

Healing Yourself – Anterior Shoulder Pain

The most common shoulder problem I encounter in yogis is one that is often overlooked even by professional musculoskeletal therapists. It is the displacement of the tendon of the long head of the biceps brachii muscle from its bicipital groove. This usually causes pain at the front (anterior) of the shoulder, which sometimes radiates down the front of the arm even to the hand.

Yoga of Hatred versus Yoga of Love

Not untimely for our current global situation our humble Shalabhasana teaches us about the significance of the yoga of hatred (Krodha Yoga) and the yoga of love (Bhakti Yoga). Although sharing the same destination, they couldn’t be more different in regards to the type of passage that they provide. Both these yogas are the driving forces behind the main characters in India’s three great epics and tales, the Ramayana, Mahabharata and Bhagavata Purana, which although ancient stories contain characters all too similar to contemporary ones. For those of you who savor Indian myth, this is one of its spiciest legends and one of my favorites.

Mapping Out The Hand

As a student of Yoga my greatest teacher remains my own yoga practice. And the most important aspect of my practice is the awareness that I apply to it. For what is awareness but the light of consciousness, our innate intelligence, prana, the vital life force that animates and lovingly sustains us and all of life. It is from this space that I discovered my ‘Map of the Hand’ that brings awareness and life to all the muscles of the shoulder and connects our arms back into our spine.

Extending your Inversions: Guidelines

In Part 1 of this article I will explained the importance of extending ones inversions, headstand and shoulder stand. I showed how for meditation to succeed what yogis call prana or amrita (nectar) needs to be accumulated or preserved. In this weeks article I will delve into the technical details and guidelines for extending one’s time spent in inversions. This process needs to be undertaken slowly and gradually over many years, as sudden increases in the time spent in these postures may backfire.

The Relationship of Headstand, Meditation and Prana

In Part 1 of this article I will explain the importance of extending ones inversions, headstand and shoulder stand. I will show how for meditation to succeed what yogis call prana or amrita (nectar) needs to be accumulated or preserved. The process to do so is called pratyahara, the fifth limb of yoga. There are three main approaches to pratyahara, i.e. Patanjali’s mental approach, Rishi Yajnavalkya’s pranic approach and Siddha Gorakhnath’s physical approach. In my own practice I found out that for swift success it is best to combine all three. Part 2 of the article will explain the practical aspects of extending inversions.

How can we live a life that focuses on spiritual practice?

A student was inspired by us retreating to a live in the bush to focus on our spiritual practice. She would like to take a similar step but, finding the preparation tough, wrote the following:

“I find myself working 8am-6pm to build a strong financial foundation to retreat from this path to spend the majority of our hours on spiritual practice. However, I’m concerned I will be ‘behind’ in my spiritual practice by the time I am truly able to focus on it. In the meantime I am preoccupied with working in order to move towards enlightenment. It feels completely incongruous to what I’m trying to achieve. Grateful for your thoughts on this.”