Janushirshasana the Key to Lotus and Baddhakonasana

In several of my books such as Yoga Meditation, I have written about the importance of having a good-quality meditation posture such as Padmasana, Siddhasana or similar. If you cannot sit comfortably chances are that discomfort will stop you from going deeper into spiritual insight. The key to most meditation postures is to be able to rotate the thighbones internally enough so that the knees are protected and the pelvis is sufficiently tilted anteriorly to keep the low-back lordotic, thus preventing low-back pain.

Extending your Inversions: Guidelines

In Part 1 of this article I will explained the importance of extending ones inversions, headstand and shoulder stand. I showed how for meditation to succeed what yogis call prana or amrita (nectar) needs to be accumulated or preserved. In this weeks article I will delve into the technical details and guidelines for extending one’s time spent in inversions. This process needs to be undertaken slowly and gradually over many years, as sudden increases in the time spent in these postures may backfire.

The Relationship of Headstand, Meditation and Prana

In Part 1 of this article I will explain the importance of extending ones inversions, headstand and shoulder stand. I will show how for meditation to succeed what yogis call prana or amrita (nectar) needs to be accumulated or preserved. The process to do so is called pratyahara, the fifth limb of yoga. There are three main approaches to pratyahara, i.e. Patanjali’s mental approach, Rishi Yajnavalkya’s pranic approach and Siddha Gorakhnath’s physical approach. In my own practice I found out that for swift success it is best to combine all three. Part 2 of the article will explain the practical aspects of extending inversions.

On Svadhyaya (self-study)

Shanna Small from the Ashtanga Picture Project interviewed me on svadhyaya. This important term, that occurs several times in the Yoga Sutra is usually translated as ‘self-study’ but in yoga the term is narrowly defined and has important connotations.

Q: I, like many people, was told that, Svadhyaya simply meant self-study and that any studying we did of ourselves was self-study. Recently, It has come to my attention, that this is incorrect. […]

On Karma

I was once interviewed by a yoga magazine about my thoughts on the difference between the traditional view of karma and the contemporary one. As I was ignorant of the contemporary view the interviewer informed me that the contemporary view is that if for example you thinking badly about somebody on the next street corner you may slip on a banana peel. […]

How to keep hold of your feet in Supta Vajrasana.

This seems to be a perennial problem for many students practising Intermediate Series. Often students here simply emulate the actions that they perform in Matsyasana, that is comfortably leaning back and placing the head on the floor.

Supta Vajrasana however couldn’t be more different.